About the CORE Grants Program


The Academy and its Foundation are committed to the future well-being of our members and their patients. In an effort to strengthen research support in all areas of otolaryngology, the AAO-HNSF has joined forces with several sub-specialty societies, foundations and industry sponsors to broaden research opportunities, and to streamline and enhance the research application and review process. The Centralized Otolaryngology Research Efforts (CORE) serves as a central clearinghouse and facilitator for otolaryngology-head and neck surgery research programs.

Since 1985, CORE has played a vital role by awarding over 500 grants and over $8 million for research projects, research training, and career development to further the specialty of otolaryngology. These grants, ranging in award size from $5,000 to $80,000, have been essential for increasing the research base for otolaryngology. Nearly a third of NIH grants held by otolaryngologists have been funded through CORE.

What is CORE?

Who are the members of CORE?

How does CORE work?

2014 CORE Funding Opportunity Announcements

Past CORE Grant Recipients (coming soon)

Support the CORE Grants Program   

CORE Frequently Asked Questions (pdf)

CORE Quick Links

What is the CORE Program?

The CORE program is a collaboration between the American Academy of Otolaryngology—Head and Neck Surgery Foundation, senior/subspecialty societies, foundations and industry sponsors to provide a uniform centralized research grant application, review, and administration process. This process was designed to achieve three objectives:

  • provide support for the most meritorious research in otolaryngology-head and neck surgery;
  • educate young investigators to prepare competitive grant applications;
  • and prepare more surgeon-scientists to serve as peer reviewers for NIH and other research agencies.

The CORE program brings greater scale and less fragmentation and overlap to otolaryngology-head and neck surgery research opportunities, reduces the aggregate costs of the individual grant programs, and enables a comprehensive overview of the spectrum of promising otolaryngology and head and neck surgery research/researchers to promote to NIH and other agencies.

 
CORE Contributing Specialty Societies, Foundations, and Industry Sponsors

The Alcon Foundation
American Academy of Otolaryngic Allergy (AAOA) Foundation
American Academy of Otolaryngology - Head and Neck Surgery (AAO-HNSF)
American Head and Neck Society (AHNS)
American Hearing Research Foundation (AHRF)
The American Laryngological, Rhinological and Otological Society, Inc. (The Triological Society)
American Laryngological Association (ALA)
American Neurotology Society (ANS)
American Rhinologic Society (ARS)
American Society of Pediatric Otolaryngology (ASPO)
Cook Medical
The Doctors Company Foundation
The Educational and Research Foundation for the American Academy of Facial Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery (AAFPRS)
Knowles Hearing Center at Northwestern University
The Oticon Foundation
The Plastic Surgery Foundation (PSF)

 
How does the CORE Grant Program work?

Each participating society has agreed to have its grant application and review process handled through the CORE Study Section which is made up of three subcommittees: Otology, Head and Neck Surgery and General Otolaryngology. The reviewers that serve on these subcommittees are made up of experienced investigators and representative physicians from the collaborating societies and foundations.

A Letter of intent (LOI) must be submitted ONLINE through proposalCENTRAL, our online application submission site, by December 16, 2013. Our standard due date for LOIs is every year on December 15th. If this date falls on a weekend, as it does this year, then applications are due the next business day. The LOI requires your name, institution, the title of your project, a brief abstract and asks you to categorize the topic by specialty, and other information. The LOI is a non-binding agreement. The LOIs assist us in gauging how many reviewers might be needed for each subcommittee to review the expected volume of applications.

Applications must be submitted ONLINE through proposalCENTRAL by midnight eastern standard time on, January 15, 2014. Each application is assigned to at least two independent expert reviewers who read the application and submit a written report covering predetermined review criteria. All reviewers then meet in March to discuss the applications and assign a priority score to each, based on significance, approach, and feasibility of the research strategy. The applications with the top scores are placed on a list for recommended funding. Each application receives a detailed Summary Statement of the review (aka "pink sheet" or critique) discussing the strengths and weaknesses of the application. This can be a valuable learning tool for future grant-writing efforts. The applications, critiques, and funding recommendations are provided to the governing bodies of the funding organizations. The funding organization is free to accept the recommendations of the CORE Study Section or not and makes funding decisions independently. Awardees are notified in late April or early May depending upon when the final decision is made by the funding organization.  The AAO-HNSF is responsible for selecting the grantees for the industry sponsored grants (i.e. The Alcon Foundation, Cook Medical, The Oticon Foundation, etc.).